DAZZLE SHIPS

“Dazzle Ships” redirects here. For the Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark album, see Dazzle Ships (album).


Dazzle camouflage, also known as Razzle Dazzle or Dazzle painting, was a camouflage paint scheme used on ships, extensively during World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. Credited to artist Norman Wilkinson, it consisted of a complex pattern of geometric shapes in contrasting colours, interrupting and intersecting each other.

Dazzle did not conceal the ship but made it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and heading. The idea was to disrupt the visual rangefinders used for naval artillery. Its purpose was confusion rather than concealment.[1] An observer would find it difficult to know exactly whether the stern or the bow is in view; and it would be equally difficult to estimate whether the observed vessel is moving towards or away from the observer’s position.[2]

Rangefinders were based on the co-incidence principle with an optical mechanism, operated by a human to compute the range. The operator adjusted the mechanism until two half-images of the target lined up in a complete picture. Dazzle was intended to make that hard because clashing patterns looked abnormal even when the two halves were aligned. This became more important when submarine periscopes included similar rangefinders. As an additional feature, the dazzle pattern usually included a false bow wave to make estimation of the ship’s speed difficult.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage

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One Comment

  1. Posted 2011/03/26 at 7:35 AM | Permalink

    this systeme can be also extremly interesting in , architecture, and monumentals sculpturespecialy for industrial instalations or rehabilitations.. or design..I have projects in progress..


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