C L /| U D E G L /| SS

Claude glass (or black mirror) is a small mirror, slightly convex in shape, with its surface tinted a dark colour. Bound up like a pocket-book or in a carrying case, black mirrors were used by artists, travellers and connoisseurs of landscape and landscape painting. Black Mirrors have the effect of abstracting the subject reflected in it from its surroundings, reducing and simplifying the colour and tonal range of scenes and scenery to give them a painterly quality.

They were famously used by picturesque artists in England in the late 18th and early 19th centuries as a frame for drawing sketches of picturesque landscapes.[1] The user would turn his back on the scene to observe the framed view through the tinted mirror—in a sort of pre-photographic lens—which added the picturesque aesthetic of a subtle gradation of tones. Father Thomas West in his A Guide to the Lakes (1778) explained “The person using it ought always to turn his back to the object that he views. It should be suspended by the upper part of the case…holding it a little to the right or the left (as the position of the parts to be viewed require) and the face screened from the sun.”

The Claude glass is named for Claude Lorrain, a 17th-century landscape painter, whose name in the late 18th century became synonymous with the picturesque aesthetic. The Claude glass was supposed to help artists produce works of art similar to those of Claude. Reverend William Gilpin, the inventor of the picturesque ideal, advocated the use of a Claude glass saying, “they give the object of nature a soft, mellow tinge like the colouring of that Master”.

Black mirrors were widely used by tourists and amateur artists, who quickly became the targets of satire. Hugh Sykes Davies observed their facing away from the object they wished to paint, commenting: “It is very typical of their attitude to Nature that such a position should be desirable”.[2] 

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_glass

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Tassili n’Ajjer [via H.FAULKNER]

Tassili n’Ajjer National Park, a part of the Sahara Desert, has a bone-dry climate with scant rainfall, yet does not blend in with Saharan dunes. Instead, the rocky plateau rises above the surrounding sand seas. Rich in geologic and human history, Tassili n’Ajjer is a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site, and covers 27,800 square miles (72,000 square kilometers) in southeastern Algeria.

This image from 2000 was made from multiple observations by the Landsat 7 satellite, using a combination of infrared, near-infrared and visible light to better distinguish between the park’s various rock types. Sand appears in shades of yellow and tan. Granite rocks appear brick red. Blue areas are likely salts. As the patchwork of colors suggests, the geology of Tassili n’Ajjer is complex. The plateau is composed of sandstone around a mass of granite.

Over the course of Earth’s history, alternating wet and dry climates have shaped these rocks in multiple ways. Deep ravines are cut into cliff faces along the plateau’s northern margin. The ravines are remnants of ancient rivers that once flowed off the plateau into nearby lakes. Where those lakes once rippled, winds now sculpt the dunes of giant sand seas. In drier periods, winds eroded the sandstones of the plateau into ‘stone forests’ and natural arches. Not surprisingly, the park’s name means ‘plateau of chasms.’

Humans have also modified the park’s rocks. Some 15,000 engravings have so far been identified in Tassili n’Ajjer. From about 10,000 B.C. to the first few centuries A.D., successive populations also left the remains of homes and burial mounds.

Image Credit: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1906.html

TOYGER

The toyger is a breed of cat, the result of breeding domestic shorthaired tabbies (beginning in the 1980s) to make them resemble a “toy tiger”, as its striped coat is reminiscent of the tiger’s. The breed’s creator, Judy Sudgen, has stated that the breed was developed in order to inspire people to care about the conservation of tigers in the wild. It was recognized for “Registration only” by The International Cat Association in the early 1990s, and in 2007 its status was upgraded to allow the breed full Championship status.[1]There are several breeders in the United States, three breeders in the UK, two in Canada as well as one in Australia working to develop the breed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyger

MOON ROCK [via H.FAULKNER]

Title:
Thin section of rock brought back to earth by Apollo 12 mission
Description:
An idea of the mineralogy and texture of a lunar sample can be achieved by use of color microphotos. This thin section is Apollo 12 lunar sample number 12057.27, under polarized light. The lavender minerals are pyrexene; the black mineral is ilmenite; the white and brown, feldspar; and the remainder, olivine.
Subject Terms:
APOLLO 12 FLIGHT APOLLO PROJECT JOHNSON SPACE CENTER LABORATORIES LUNAR COMPOSITION LUNAR GEOLOGY LUNAR ROCKS PHOTOMICROGRAPHS SAMPLES TEXAS

http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/luceneweb/caption.jsp?selections=AS12&browsepage=Go&keywords=null&pageno=20&hitsperpage=5&photoId=S70-20954

MARBLED BENGEL


..I deliberately crossed leopard cats with domestic cats for several important reasons. At that time, wild cats were being exploited for the fur market. Nursing female leopard cats defending their nests were shot for their pelts, and the cubs were shipped off to pet stores worldwide. Unsuspecting cat lovers bought them, unaware of the danger, their unpleasant elimination habits and the unsuitability of keeping wild cats as pets. Most of the wild kittens from this era ended up in zoos or escaped onto city streets. I hoped that by putting a leopard coat on a domestic cat, the pet trade could be safely satisfied. If fashionable women could be dissuaded from wearing furs that look like friends’ pets, the diminished demand would result in less poaching of wild species.

-Jean Mill (née Sugden)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bengal_(cat)

1987 YAMAHA FZ 750

1987 Yamaha FZ750

Yamaha FZ 750 – based running prototype, Design by Hartmut Esslinger / Frog Design

http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/photos/prototype-spy-concept/Yamaha-1987-FZ750.htm

 

((WILSON_AUDIO))

Wilson Audio is an American high-end audio company, located in Utah, run and founded by David Wilson. Wilson Audio manufactures and sells loudspeakers and subwoofers.

Wilson Audio is known in the audiophile community as offering some of the most expensive speaker designs in existence.[1] When Wilson Audio first began offering its products in the early 1980s, the highest priced small “monitor” speaker was $1,600 per pair. Wilson’s small WATT speaker was introduced at $4,400 per pair.[1] The most inexpensive stereo speaker from Wilson Audio, the bookshelf-sized Duette, sells for about $10,000 US per pair, while home theater “Watch” center and rear channel speakers cost over $5,500. Their most expensive stereo speakers, the Alexandria X-2 Series 2, sell for $158,000 MSRP per pair and up, depending on finish.

Wilson Audio is known for building highly rigid speaker cabinets. They construct their loudspeaker enclosures from non-wood materials such as phenolic resin composites and epoxy laminates. The cabinets are painted using a high-gloss automotive process in a variety of colors.

Current Products

  • Alexandria X-2 Series 2
  • MAXX Series 3
  • Polaris
  • Sasha W/P
  • Sophia Series 3
  • Duette
  • W.A.T.C.H. (Wilson Audio Theater Comes Home) Theater System
    • WATCH Surrounds
    • WATCH Center Channel

Sub woofers

  • Thor’s Hammer
  • WATCH Dog

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilson_Audio

-http://www.wilsonaudio.com/index.shtml

53rd&3rd[“TRYIN’2TURN A TRICK”]_BLDNG | MADOFF_BLDNG | LIPSTICK_BLDNG

The Lipstick Building (also known as 53rd at Third) is a 453 foot (138 meters) tall skyscraper located at 885 Third Avenue, between East 53rd Street and 54th Street, across from the Citigroup Center in ManhattanNew York CityUnited States. It was completed in1986 and has 34 floors. The building was designed by John Burgee Architects with Philip Johnson.[1] The building receives its name from its shape and color, which resemble a tube of lipstick.

At three levels, blocks of the building recede as part of Manhattan’s zoning regulation in which the building is required to recede within its spatial envelope, to increase the availability of light to street level. The result is a form that looks as though it could retract telescopically. The shape, which is unusual in comparison to surrounding buildings, uses less space at the base than a regular skyscraper of quadrilateral footprint would use. This provides more room for the high numbers of pedestrians who travel via Third Avenue.

At the base, the building stands on columns which act as an entrance for a vast post-modern hall. They are two stories high and separate the street from the nine-meter high lobby. Because the elevators and emergency staircases are located to the rear of the building, this area is “hollow”.

The exterior of the building is a continuous wall of red enameled Imperial granite and steel. The ribbon windows are surrounded by gray frames. In between each floor is a small line of red which is taken from the red color of lipstick. The curvature of the building allows light to reflect off the surface at different places.

The company that owned the building filed for bankruptcy in 2010.

Notable tenants

Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities leased the 17th through 19th floors. Madoff operated his $65 billion Ponzi scheme, which came unraveled in 2008, from the 17th floor, which was occupied by no more than 24 employees.[2][3]

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipstick_Building

//KRELL_AMPLIFIERS\\

Krell Industries Inc., founded by its C.E.O. and chief designer Dan D’Agostino, is one of America’s largest manufacturers of high-end audio systems. While most of their acclaim has come from their power amplifiers and CD players (their flagship model being the Master Reference Amplifier with a price of roughly $100K), they also make pre amplifiersloudspeakerssubwoofers and SACD players.

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krell_Industries

High-end audio is a demanding pursuit; an ongoing quest for excellence in music reproduction that drives equipment manufacturers to strive for the absolute in design and performance. With a keen understanding of this passionate drive, Krell Industries was founded in 1980.

For nearly three decades, Krell has earned a distinguished reputation for engineering innovation and product excellence. The company’s history is replete with product introductions that have deeply impacted the high-end audio industry. The most discriminating audiophiles and product reviewers have consistently recognized Krell components for standard-setting performance. The sheer breadth of Krell amplifiers’ dynamic range capabilities conveys a startling realism that transcends previous designs. Seemingly unlimited frequency response, combined with unerring accuracy and fortitude, extend a tradition that began with the first Krell amplifier; the KSA-100. The KSA-100 was the first high power, high-current, true Class A biased stereo power amplifier available to audiophiles. It was the first Krell product, and its resounding success established Krell as an important new technological contributor to high-end audio.

From the KSA-100 to the present, Krell continually “pushes the envelope” of performance in our search for greater amplifier power. Exploration of new technologies, driven by a never-ending quest to elevate the standard of excellence, has resulted in breakthrough audio designs. Over the years, the Krell line of power amplifiers, including benchmark products such as the KRS-100, KRS-200, and the Audio Standard models, has established a legacy of unparalleled sonic performance.

The Krell product line has diversified, but Krell’s fundamental research into amplifier design and performance remains at the core of the company’s achievements. Every Krell component upholds the legacy, incorporating unique technologies that are the direct result of Krell’s discoveries in audio amplification. They provide unprecedented linearity with the control and accuracy that only comes from superior current capability. The sound is lively and unconstrained, in a manner that evokes live performance and the true sound of instruments. The Krell legacy will continue to evolve with products that deliver innovative engineering, perfection in build quality, and outstanding audio performance.

-http://www.krellonline.com/story.html

KSA-250

KSA-150

KSA-50S

MDA-300

 

 

1LIBERTY PLZ? U.S.STEELE BLDNG! [via Mr. O]


One Liberty Plaza, formerly the U.S. Steel Building, is a skyscraper in lower ManhattanNew York City, at the location of the formerSinger Building (in 1968, the third tallest structure ever demolished). 1 Liberty Plaza is currently owned and operated by Brookfield Properties. The building is 743 ft (226 m) high and 54 floors. It was built in 1973. At 2,200,000 sq ft (204,000 m2), each floor offers almost 1 acre (4,047 m2) of office space, making it one of the largest office buildings in New York.

Its facade is black, consisting of a structural steel frame. The building was originally commissioned by U.S. Steel.

The building sits next to the former World Trade Center site. Following the events of September 11, 2001, the building had broken windows and light facade damage. Brooks Brothers on the ground floor of the building was used as a temporary morgue in the days following the attack.

As of 2006, it is the 188th tallest building in the world.

Architect(s) Skidmore, Owings and Merrill

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Liberty_Plaza